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Africa CDC Launches Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance Network

November 7, 2017 | Veyrier-du-Lac (France)

During the annual Advanced Course on Diagnostics (ACDx), Africa Centers for Disease Control launched its plan to combat antimicrobial resistant (AMR) infections. Africa CDC’s framework aligns with the WHO Global action plan on AMR.

Africa CDC’s Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance Network (AMRSNET) will gather together public health leaders, epidemiologists, laboratory policy experts, and other stakeholders from human, animal, and environmental health: "Within the next 5 years, AMRSNET will work to improve detection of antibiotic resistant infections in humans and animals, delay its emergence, limit transmission, and mitigate harm among patients infected. To achieve these goals, AMRSNET will advocate for policies and laws to enable long-term prevention and control and strengthen human resources capacity.”

The Advanced Course on Diagnostics (ACDx)

Organized by the Mérieux Foundation and the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine (LSHTM), ACDx was held on October 29th through November 3rd at Les Pensières Center for Global Health. In its eighth edition, the intensive course trained more than thirty-eight scientists and decision-makers from twenty countries.

This year’s course placed particular emphasis on AMR, which WHO considers “an increasingly serious threat to global public health.”

Marc Sprenger, Director of the WHO secretariat for antimicrobial resistance, presented the WHO Global action plan on AMR.

The representatives of developing countries presented their action plans to fight and monitor AMR. Initiatives to strengthen research in this area were also presented.

An overview of the latest advances in the field of diagnostics

Led by Rosanna Peeling, Professor and Chair of Diagnostics Research and Director of the International Diagnostics Centre (IDC) at the LSHTM, ACDx provides participants with an overview of the latest advances in the field of diagnostics.

ACDx strengthens the skills and knowledge of participants by providing training on the role of diagnostics in global health, on diagnostic system strengthening, and on high quality policy in diagnostics.

The course also explores development of new diagnostic tests, illustrating the difficulties faced by industry—from the design process to the market introduction—and the utilization of new products.

During the course, representatives from Ministries of Health, industry, and NGOs discuss how best to implement health policies in the field of diagnostics.

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